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An employer may.

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For example, an accommodation would be considered overly burdensome if it would impose undue hardship or undue risk to the health or safety of any worker.

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. May 23, 2023 · For example, certain jobs such as food server or in-store cashier require employees to perform the work on-site. The WHD explains that undue hardship is analyzed on an “individual employee basis,” i.

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. . May 15, 2023 · Employers are required to accommodate the religious needs of employees under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, so long as they can do so without imposing an “undue hardship.

. These factors include the nature and cost of.

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, that the specific employee’s needs would cause an undue hardship in light of the size, financial resources, nature, and. It also requires employers to provide reasonable accommodations to allow employees with disabilities to do their jobs, unless doing so would create undue hardship.

. Examples of when anxiety is.

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The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) makes clear in its publication, Employer-Provided Leave and the ADA, that employees with disabilities can be entitled to leave as an accommodation, whether it be intermittent, short-term, or extended, when granting leave will not create an undue hardship for the business.
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It allows employers to deny accommodations far short of any fair meaning of undue hardship. According to the U. .

. The size, type, and financial resources of the specific facility where the accommodation would occur. . On April 17, 2020, the Equal Employment Opportunity. .

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. The ADA National Network defines undue hardship” as an “action requiring significant difficulty or expense” given any number of circumstances.

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The size, resources, nature and structure of the employer’s operation must be considered.

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Reasonable accommodations must not cause an undue hardship to the employer.